Pokémon Sold More Copies In Its First Week Than Any Other Switch Game

Nintendo’s first Pokémon game on the Nintendo Switch may have launched to mixed feelings from fans, but the sales numbers are absolutely off the chart.

According to @Poke_Times, both Pikachu and Eevee combined have sold more than three million copies in its first week of release – which has “seems to have updated the world’s highest sales number of the first week of release!” [Translated].

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Congratulations, Let’s Go Pikachu and Eevee!

Credit: Nintendo

Enjoy the title while it lasts, because I have a feel next month’s release of Super Smash Bros. Ultimate might be taking the crown…

The latest Pokemon games are an interesting thing, because in counting each title separately, they don’t even beat-out the Spyro Reignited Trilogy in the UK sales charts, whereas combining their sales figures definitely knocks Spyro from the number one spot.

Credit: Nintendo

When Let’s Go Pikachu and Eevee were first announced, they received mixed reception from fans. People loved the graphics and the return to Pokémon Yellow – but the traditional capturing mechanics have been swapped out for Pokémon GO!-style play – and people weren’t happy.

Despite receiving glowing reviews from critics since its release, the hatred for the Let’s Go games has gotten out of hand, with thousands of people posting negative reviews – even without having played it.

Credit: Nintendo

The titles are getting ‘review-bombed,’ something which it unfortunately becoming more and more common. Essentially, a ‘review-bomb’ is when people spam websites with negative reviews to bring a game’s score down as low as it can go.

According to Metacritic [via Nintendo Life], Let’s Go Pikachu currently has 354 negative reviews and 366 positive at the time of writing.

Metacritic allows for reviews to be left from a game’s launch date, which means a lot of these reviews are probably valid. However, the game is being branded “offensive” to Poke-fans, as well as a “lazy cash grab,” which focus more on the creation of the game, and not its playable result.

Have you played the games?