Twitter Rips Into Journalist For Comparing New Spyro To Dark Souls

The Spyro Reignited Trilogy launched yesterday, and people are loving the HD trip down nostalgia lane. Or at least, most people are.

Credit: Insomniac Games/Toys For Bob

Twitter is laying into a journalist from Eurogamer for her review of the game, in which she compares the Trilogy to the notoriously difficult Dark Souls.

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In the review, which you can read here, reporter Emma Kent writes of one of the game’s boss fights: “The breakneck shift in difficulty, meanwhile, felt like I’d suddenly been dropped into Dark Souls in the middle of a game of tiddlywinks.”

Credit: Insomniac Games/Toys For Bob

Of course, this is 2018 and this was a statement the internet just couldn’t cope with, and Twitter is absolutely not impressed.

One player tweeted: “IMAGINE THINKING THE SPYRO GAMES ARE DARK SOULS HARD!!!!!”

Another added: “People saying that Spyro is hard like Dark Souls makes me want to vomit.”

Check out the boss video below!

It’s become a bit of a thing now to compare any difficult game to the behemoths that are the Souls games, and people were quick to mock comparisons of the Crash Bandicoot remake to the FromSoftware games when it launched earlier this year.

The comparison raises an interesting question about the difficulty levels of games we all played as kids. Older games now definitely seem pretty tough for a newer audience, but we all blasted through them in our youth without seeming to notice how tricky they could be. Could it be that games have gotten easier over the years?

Credit: FromSoftware

Or maybe game devs working on reboots and remakes are amping up the difficulty level knowing their target market are those who want that nostalgia-hit from the PlayStation One games, and those Spyro kids are now fully-fledged adults who need some meatier content in their games.

What do you think? Have games gotten easier over the years, or have remasters and remakes been designed to be more difficult so as to appeal to their now-grown-up audiences?